cancer connection

Everyone’s cancer journey is unique. Still, there are some elements of that journey that are shared by many who have cancer.

Find out how Canadians diagnosed with cancer tackled the various stages of the cancer journey – from getting the news, telling friends and family, talking to kids and being your own advocate, to issues of body image, coping and practical advice. Our themed videos explore each issue from several different perspectives.

Telling friends and family
Telling friends and family
“I think if I broke down, that would have been helpful for them. They could have consoled me. But I didn’t allow that.”
Talking to kids
Talking to kids
“We also found it really important to involve our kids in the whole thing.”
Getting the news
Getting the news
“I almost felt a bit frantic during those first few weeks afterwards because you think “OK, I do have cancer, so what does this mean?”
Be your own advocate
Be your own advocate
“I think having just a sense of involvement in my own care has and continues to be hugely important to me.”
What I learned about myself
What I learned about myself
“It took a knock on my head like cancer for me to feel this great joy of my life.”
Body image
Body image
“It’s a bit unsettling when you’re used to seeing yourself with hair to suddenly find you’re as bald as a billiard ball.”
The hard parts
The hard parts
“Well, we always see on TV or different areas where people get news such as getting cancer and it’s devastating. You really don’t know how devastating it is until it happens to you.”
Coping
Coping
“I approached my whole experience with cancer like a hockey playoff series. I thought about it in those terms; I talked about it in those terms.”
Practical advice
Practical advice
“And I think the best advice that I can give people is to feel your fear, meet your fear and try and leave the fear a little bit to the side. Don’t let it define every single waking moment.”
Rural Living
Rural Living
“The treatment for cancer is sometimes referred to as a full-time job. I can say that it is a job and a half when you live where I do because it’s pretty difficult here in the north.”
Returning to Work
Returning to Work
“Getting back into the workforce, getting back into a normal life or trying to find that new normal – I didn’t know what was going to happen.”
Last updated: June 18, 2013