Integrating Cancer Control with Tobacco Control

Research shows tobacco use by cancer patients reduces the effectiveness of their treatment and their likelihood of survival. There is an opportunity for the tobacco control and cancer control communities to work together to help prevent Canadians from starting to smoke, help those who wish to quit smoking, and specifically support Canadian cancer patients who wish to quit smoking. That’s why the Partnership recently established a new initiative to support better integration of tobacco control and cancer control resources across the country.

Integrating Cancer Control with Tobacco Control report Accelerating Evidence-Informed Action on Tobacco: Integrating Cancer Control with Tobacco Control
In March 2014, the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer convened 50 people from across Canada with the aim of accelerating knowledge exchange, and integrating cancer control and tobacco control efforts through new partnerships and new forms of collaboration at the Accelerating Evidence-Informed Action on Tobacco: Integrating Cancer Control with Tobacco Control workshop.

 

Integrating tobacco cessation + relapse prevention Integrating Tobacco Cessation and Relapse Prevention to Improve Quality of Cancer Care
In 2016, the Partnership invested in two territories and seven provinces to plan, implement or evaluate integration of evidence-based tobacco cessation and relapse prevention within their cancer systems.

 

Tobacco Cessation

Leading Practices in Tobacco Cessation Program Scans

One of the key processes at the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is to identify best practices and share them across the cancer continuum. An important step in this process is to scan the current landscape.

Leading Practices in Clinical Smoking Cessation report Leading Practices in Clinical Smoking Cessation v3.0
This scan provides information on current clinical smoking cessation practices in Canada, and integrates evidence-based recommendations to assist in identifying “leading” practices. By sharing these practices across the country, practitioners and policy specialists can learn from each other and improve their current practices in tobacco cessation. This scan will be updated annually; the next update is planned for early 2017.
Resource summary

 

Leading Practices in First Nations, Inuit and Métis Smoking Cessation report Leading Practices in First Nations, Inuit and Métis Smoking Cessation v2.0 
This scan provides information on current practices in smoking cessation programs developed by, with and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis across Canada by jurisdiction. This scan will be updated annually; the next update is planned for early 2017.
Resource summary

 

Infographics

Cessation Aids and Coverage in Canada infographic Cessation Aids and Coverage in Canada
This infographic provides an overview of the coverage of tobacco cessation aids by federal, provincial and territorial governments as of April 2016.

 

Webinars

Leading Practices in Clinical + First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Smoking Cessation: A 2015-16 Update Leading Practices in Clinical + First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Smoking Cessation: A 2015-16 Update
Webinars were held in July and August 2016 to provide an overview of the clinical smoking cessation program scan methodology and the 2015-16 fiscal year results.

 

 

Evidence Syntheses

Impacts of Continued Tobacco Use/Tobacco Cessation Among Cancer Patients

Tobacco Cessation Interventions Across Cancer Care Continuum

Rapid Review on the Economic Evaluation of Smoking Cessation in the Oncology Setting

 

Emerging Issues in Tobacco

Issue backgrounders are point in time overviews of what federal, provincial, territorial and municipal jurisdictions across Canada are doing to address tobacco control issues as they relate to cancer control.

Note: These documents will be updated on a quarterly basis.

Waterpipe Use in Canada backgrounder Waterpipe Use in Canada
Over the past two decades waterpipes are increasingly being used in Europe and North America, especially among youth and young adults. There is a widespread misconception that waterpipe smoking is safer than cigarette smoking. However, using a waterpipe to smoke tobacco is known to pose serious health risks to both the smoker and those exposed to its second-hand smoke, and is therefore an important issue for cancer and tobacco control efforts.

 

Flavoured Tobacco in Canada backgrounder Flavoured Tobacco in Canada
Flavoured tobacco products have existed for over one hundred years; however, recent advancements in flavouring technology have broadened the variety and attractiveness of possible flavours. Since approximately 2009, several countries, including Canada, have restricted the availability of flavoured tobacco. However, regulations are often not comprehensive, targeting only very specific products or flavours.

 

Electronic Cigarettes Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems backgrounder cover Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems in Canada
Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) are an important issue in cancer control because:

  1. They have the potential to cause harm through exposure to carcinogens and other substances in ENDS parts, liquid, and vapour, as a method to become addicted to nicotine, and as a possible gateway to use of other tobacco products;
  2. They may be a potential harm reduction strategy for tobacco users, as a smoking cessation aid.

 

Canadian Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) Policy Map

The Canadian Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) Policy Map illustrates federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal electronic nicotine delivery system policy development across Canada. Each entry on the map includes a brief description of a proposed or adopted policy, as well as link to the source policy document. This policy map will be updated on a regular basis.

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) are non-combustible battery operated devices that deliver an aerosol (“vapour”) by heating a solution users inhale. ENDS products include, but are not limited to, electronic cigarettes (often referred to as “e-cigarettes”), personal vaporizers, vape pens, e-cigars, e-pipes, and e-hookahs.

Find more resources from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer on tobacco control policies here.
Tobacco Map Legend

**Note: Not all policy information will be available in both French and English at this time. Map content is translated quarterly.

 

Last updated: January 16, 2017